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[ SOLVED ] Lean Interview Questions and Answers

Last updated on 23rd Sep 2022, Blog, Interview Question

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1.What are the crucial elements of a Lean Manufacturing?

Ans:

  • Empower people and fellow employees in a company for building trust between a workforce and the management.
  • Eliminate a Waste. Given that Eliminating Waste is the core reason why are manufacturers should integrate lean in their production facilities. It is essential toa focus on this USP.
  • Lean aims to make a things as simple as possible to make an entire process transparent and simple to remember.

2.What are the seven waste products in a Lean Manufacturing?

Ans:

  • Inventory
  • Defects
  • Waiting
  • Over-processing
  • Transport
  • Overproduction

3.How can achieve a lean manufacturing with us?

Ans:

  • Kaizen
  • Demand-based flow manufacturing
  • KPIs, Measurement, and visualization

4.How can calculate a Takt Time?

Ans:

Takt time in a Lean manufacturing represents the average time required to meet up a customer’s demand capacity. Takt time is usually calculated by the following equation:

  • Takt time = Ta÷ D
  • The formula would help get a overall production time (Ta) alongside the rate of a customer (D) to find Takt time. Production time doesn’t denote a total amount that a machine runs or an entirety of the workday. Rather, Takt time indicates a total hours employees work, which they haven’t spent on a maintenance, meetings, lunch, breaks, and planned stoppages.

5.What is a History of Lean Manufacturing?

Ans:

The formal Lean manufacturing processes that are in used today, however, really got started with a Henry Ford and the assembly line for his vehicles. That was then taken to a next level and further formalized by a Toyota Motor Company using their ‘Toyota Production System.’ Using a ‘just in time’ production method allowed their manufacturing systems to not only produce greater number of vehicles, but also produced them with a far less waste. This helped to a boost the profitability of a company while also increasing a customer satisfaction since they were getting more of what they wanted.

6.What are 5s methods, and why is it important?

Ans:

Seiri or Organize: Seiri eliminates a everything that cannot be compartmentalized, like parts, tools, instructions from a unneeded materials.

Seiton or Orderliness: Organizes an everything which remains by neatly arranging and at a same time identifying tools and parts for a seamless usage.

Seiketsu or Standardize: Scheduling a maintenance and regular cleaning by the overseeing seiton, seiri, and seiso every day.

Seiso or Cleanliness: Organizes the cleanup campaign to clean a work area.

Shitsuke or Discipline: It ensures that a 5S is way of life in a Lean Manufacturing.Shitsuke also provides a follow-up habits of first four S’s in the list.

Benefits of 5S:

  • Improves a safety.
  • Diminishes of defect rates.
  • Ensures a higher equipment availability.
  • Reduces a costs.
  • Increases a production flexibility and agility.
  • Better utilization of a assets.
  • Improves morale of an employees.
  • Enhances an overall image of the enterprise to the suppliers, customers, management, and employees.

7.What is a Purpose of volume leveling?

Ans:

Production leveling is an effective technique to reduce a mura or unevenness that further reduces a Muda or waste. Production leveling is crucial to increase an efficiency in lean manufacturing. The goal of volume leveling is to produce goods and products immediately in consistent manner. The process needs to be carried out a predictably and consistently.

8.What are the Muri, Mura, and Muda?

Ans:

  • Muda or Waste.
  • Muri or Overburden.
  • Mura or Unevenness.
  • All three enemies are interrelated, and maintaining them should be a top priority in the production process.

9.What is a Kanban in lean?

Ans:

In Lean Manufacturing, Kanban is a technique that eliminates an inventory and labor waste. Kanban relies on a pull production to reduce waste. As a technique, Kanban regulates a production of items according to demand and a consumer supply. Rather than estimating the volume of a specific items that are needed in a market. Kanban ensures a production of items in a most straightforward manner as per the market’s demands.Kanban also provides a trails for pilot programs for the certain employees to experience holistic pull system & teamwork. Visual systems must be an exponentially indispensable.

10.What is a SMED in Lean Manufacturing?

Ans:

SMED or Single-Minute Exchange of a Dies is lean system that dramatically reduced the time taken to completing an equipment transfiguration. The very essence of a SMED in a lean manufacturing is to convert an external changeover steps. It simplifies and, at a same time, streamlines conclusive efforts.

11.What is benefits of a SMED in a Lean Manufacturing?

Ans:

  • When a changeovers are faster, it suggests a downtime of equipment will be seemingly less. Ultimately this lowers a cost of manufacturing.
  • Faster changeovers would enable a frequent product changes, further giving rise to the smaller size for lots.
  • Small-size lots enable a flexible scheduling by an improving responsiveness to the counter customer demand.
  • The streamlined changeover process an improves both the quality and consistency to help a startups kick-start most smoothly. If lot sizes are smaller, it further results in a lowering an inventory levels.

12.Which Japanese of term refers to a continuous improvement?

Ans:

Kaizen is a Japanese term refers to the continuous improvement.

13.Which waste elimination technique focus on the organizing the workplace?

Ans:

5S is a waste elimination technique focus on a organizing the workplace.

14.What does a six sigma performance measurement involves?

Ans:

An Average and a Variation computation.

15.How is lean manufacturing achieved by the organization?

Ans:

Lean manufacturing achieved by the organization by a Elimination of Waste.

16.Where is a muri technique primarily applied?

Ans:

Muri technique primarily applied to a New product design.

17.What are the key elements of a Lean?

Ans:

  • Empowering people to build a trust between the management and the workforce.
  • Eliminate a waste.
  • Make it as simple as possible as a simple things are understood and remembered.
  • Doing one thing at a time by focusing on a problem-solving before moving.
  • Smooth information flow with the minimum friction.
  • Visual Interpretation help to know when a process is not a functioning.
  • Building quality – Products and processes perform as are expected, first time and every time with the consistency.

18.Name the different types of a waste in terms of a Lean?

Ans:

  • Correction
  • Overproduction
  • Inventory
  • Unnecessary Motion
  • Transportation
  • Delays
  • Complicated Process
  • Unutilized People skills

19.Describe a typical process of implementing Lean?

Ans:

  • First it needs basic education of a company’s leadership, their understanding, and acceptance of undertaking.
  • Second step involved forming and educating of Kaizen Team of the key employees in the use of a Lean tools.
  • Involves a Project assessment, analysis, and selection.
  • Focus on establishing a goals and objectives.
  • Conduct a Kaizen event including Value Stream Mapping (VSM) inside the company’s four walls and 5S.
  • Expand education of a associates through an original Kaizen Team.
  • Understand how culture change is affecting an organization and communicate a benefits continually.

20.How long does it take to implement a Lean?

Ans:

The process of sustaining a momentum is the real challenge to a any Lean undertaking. Due to which company leaders are show their commitment. Clearly Improvements may be begin quickly.

21.Explain a term BOM?

Ans:

The term “Bill Of Materials” refers to the list of items or parts that go into assembling product. A lawn mower, for example, needs the handle assembly, a metal deck assembly, the control assembly, and a motor and a blade assembly.

22.What is a DCR?

Ans:

DCR stands for a Document Change Request, which is a request for the change to a document, SOP (standard operating procedure), or specification that addresses problem and the proposes a solution.

23.What is a Kanban?

Ans:

Kanban is a scheduling method that tells a manufacturers how much to make, what to make, and when to made it. Inventory is only refilled in this system when visual indications such as an empty bin or cart are to be detected.

24.What is a MES?

Ans:

The term “MES” refers to the system that organizes and regulates production on a factory floor in order to reduce overall time it takes to complete the order.

25.What is a Six Sigma?

Ans:

Six sigma is a data-driven methodology and approach for reducing a faults in any process, from manufacturing to the transactional to product and service.

26.What is a difference between lean manufacturing and JIT (Just-in-Time) Manufacturing?

Ans:

Lean Manufacturing re-examines a concept of just-in-time (JIT) from a customer’s perspective. Anything created should offer a value to the customer’s requirements. For example, if designing a stereo system for the luxury car, and consider a factors such as sound quality, durability, space occupancy, loud or medium sound, and so on. JIT (Just-in-Time) is the methodology for ensuring that a product or item is delivered just in a time to be used. This method saves a money by reducing a cost of underutilized goods and decreasing a requirement for stockpiling.

27.What is a QMS?

Ans:

Quality Management System (QMS) is the document that contains all relevant information regarding a firm’s design and operational controls, such as issue reporting, monitoring, continuous improvement, and training, in order to an ensure that an organization produces a consistent product.

28.What is a batch production?

Ans:

Batch production is a manufacturing technique that involved for producing a components or items in batches rather than in continuous stream. When similar things are created be simultaneously, this practise is a commonly used.

29.What is challenge in manufacturing products?

Ans:

The major issue in manufacturing is to improved a production processes, guarantee that a proper materials and components are available at t a lowest possible cost, reduce production time, eliminate waste, and maintain a product quality.

30.List out a factors that can affect manufacturing process?

Ans:

The factors affect a manufacturing process are: a Supplies Equipment Factory Overhead a Special Parts Work Force.

31.Define a term “factory overhead”?

Ans:

Whatever costs are spent during a production process, excluding a cost of materials and direct labour, is referred to as a “factory overhead.”

32.List out some of examples of a factory overhead?

Ans:

Following are overheads a production manufacturing engineer has to be consider: Factory rent Utilities used in a unit Costs behind equipment set up a Costs behind equipment maintenance Production unit supplies an Insurance covered on equipment’s and also production facilities Fringe benefits a Depreciation QA Salaries Property taxes on a manufacturing facilities Material management salaries.

33.How to supervise in manufacturing unit?

Ans:

Step 1: Keep track of different stages of a manufacture and finds whether a volume of goods produced by a crew is sufficient to meet a demand.

Step 2: Look for a bottlenecks in a system and figure out how to fix them.

Step 3: Keep an inventory records and aim to the limit the amount of a liquid capital used once unneeded materials are to be removed.

Step 4: Examine finished goods to see if fulfill a company’s quality requirements.

34.How can calculate a manufacturing work in progress?

Ans:

When a manufacturing company transforms a raw materials, labour, and factory overhead into work in a progress, it is referred to as manufacturing work in the progress. The costs for the manufacturing work in a progress by multiplying all of factors listed below. the cost of labour Inventory expenses for a raw materials Cost of production For an accounting period, the cost of completing work in a progress.

35.What is a product report?

Ans:

A product report is a generic phrase for an information about the product’s design, manufacturing, quality, sales, and repair.

36.What is a RMA?

Ans:

Return Material Authorization (RMA) is a financial and work order tracking system that is used to find the provenance of a returned item. It’s frequently used in a transactions where a customer returns merchandise to a manufacturer for replacement or the repair.

37.What is a SCAR (Supplier Corrective Action Request)?

Ans:

Manufacturers rely heavily on raw material suppliers, therefore a SCAR is used to connect with them successfully. It’s a request for the change that details problems with a supplier’s process or material and asks for remedy. It may also offer data about how the problem should be handled.

38.What are software’s which can be useful in a manufacturing unit?

Ans:

Manufacturing ERP and Material Management are the two types of software that might be used in the manufacturing operation. SAP, Oracle ERP system, and others are some of an organizations that supply manufacturing software solutions.

39.What is a GMP?

Ans:

GMP stands for a good manufacturing practise, and it is used to monitor and manage a manufacturing of foods, medical equipment, and pharmaceutical items, as well as a quality control testing.

40.What are the approach used in a manufacturing for QA?

Ans:

The approaches used for QA in manufacturing are an Acceptance sampling: Instead of testing an entire batch, a random sample is chosen from a batch.

Statistical process control: A manufacturing product can be monitored using a control charts and data obtained for samples at various phases of the production.

Troubleshooting studies: At the end of a line, a troubleshooting study can be conducted to check if changes in a input variables are linked to a output variables.

41.What is a Lean Methodology?

Ans:

In health care, manufacturing, and the other industries, lean approach is employed. It’s a business concept in which a companies try to generate a comprehensive flow of flow using a specific elemental notions. The basic values of a Lean Methodology are Continuous Improvement and a Value Stream.

42.What is a purpose of volume leveling?

Ans:

Mura, or unevenness, can be reduced through a production leveling, which also minimizes a Muda, or waste. In lean manufacturing, production levelling is a critical for increasing efficiency. Volume levelling aims to create the goods and products in a consistent and timely manner. The procedure must be followed in the predictable and consistent manner.

43.What are seven waste products in a Lean Manufacturing?

Ans:

Muda refers to a lean process of eliminating waste. According to an appearances, waste elimination occurs within a production system; Lean is responsible for several sorts of waste.Its goal is to integrate all of procedures required for holistic, high-efficiency production. Simultaneously, it lowers total expenditures while increasing a revenue. Inventory, defects, waiting, over-processing, transportation, and overproduction are now classified as a seven categories of wastes in a Lean Manufacturing.

44.What are crucial elements of Lean Manufacturing?

Ans:

Waste should be an eliminated. Given that the primary motivation for a firms to implement lean in their manufacturing plants is to reduce a waste. It is critical to the concentrate on this USP. Lean tries to simplify a things as much as possible in order to make an entire process visible and simple to recall. As in production, concentrate on one problem at a time; there is always one or the other. In very expressive approach, lean manufacturing could assist solve a one problem after the another without compromising.

45.Explain concept of a Fishbone diagram?

Ans:

A fishbone diagram, also known as a Ishikawa diagram, is a visual technique for the categorizing potential sources of a problem in order to find its fundamental causes.

46.What is a load testing process?

Ans:

The load testing procedure involveds placing a demand on software system or computing system and also observing how it responds.

47.What is a Parkinson’s law?

Ans:

The proverb “work expands to fill as a time available for a completion” is a Parkinson’s law. It’s sometimes used to explain an organization’s growing bureaucracy.

48.What is value stream?

Ans:

Value Streams are the processes taken by organization to create a solutions that deliver a constant flow of value to customer. Every value stream in a SAFe portfolio is committed to a building and supporting a set of solutions, which are products, services, or systems offered to a Customer, whether inside or external to an Enterprise.

49.What is a process mapping?

Ans:

A process map is a planning and management tool that depicts a flow of work in a visual manner. Process maps, created with the process mapping software, depict a sequence of actions that lead to the specific outcome.

50.How can Lean affect a supply chain?

Ans:

A “Lean” supply chain is the supply chain optimized to deliver products quickly and with a little to no waste. From Lean tools to a philosophy of continuous improvement, businesses can reduce costs by translating a principles of Lean manufacturing to supply chain.

51.What is a SCAMPER method?

Ans:

Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify (also magnify and minify), Put to the another use, Eliminate, and Reverse (SCAMPER) is acronym constructed from an abbreviations of: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify (also magnify and minify), Put to the another use, Eliminate, and Reverse. SCAMPER is a lateral thinking approach that lets explore a new alternatives by challenging a current quo.

52.What is a cross docking?

Ans:

Cross docking is logistics process in which products from the supplier or manufacturing plant are delivered straight to a consumer or retail chain with a little or no processing or storage time. Cross docking takes occur in a distribution docking terminal, which usually has a trucks and dock doors on two sides (inbound and outgoing) and a little storage space.

53.What is a poka yoke?

Ans:

Shigeo Shingo, an industrial engineer of Toyota, created a phrase Poka-Yoke (poh-kah yoh-keh) in a Japan during the 1960s. Shingo also developed and a codified Zero Quality Control, which combines a Poka-Yoke procedures for defect correction and source inspection for the defect prevention.

54.What is GANTT chart?

Ans:

A Gantt chart, which is widely used in a project management, is one of the most famous and useful ways to depict the activities (tasks or events) against time. A list of activities may be found on a left side of the chart, and a suitable time scale can be found along top. Each action is represented by the bar, whose location and length indicate an activity’s start, duration, and end dates.

55.What is a Takt Time?

Ans:

Takt time refers to the rate at which must finish a product in order to meet a client demand. If receive a new product order an every four hours, for example,a team must complete a product in a four hours or fewer to meet demand. Takt time is a sell rate, and it’s easy to think of it as the heartbeat of a business. It enables to best utilize a capacity in order to satisfy demand without maintaining excessive inventory on a hand.

56.What is a TQM?

Ans:

Total quality management (TQM) is explained as a management technique that focuses on a long-term performance through customer satisfaction. All members of organization participate in a TQM Endeavour by working to increase processes, products, services, and the culture in which they operate.

57.What is balanced scorecard?

Ans:

A balanced scorecard is the strategy performance management tool — a well-structured report that a managers may use to keep track of the activities carried out by a workers under their supervision and also repercussions of these actions.

58.Define what is perpetual inventory system?

Ans:

A perpetual inventory system is inventory management strategy that uses an inventory management system that automates a process to track when merchandise is sold or received in a real-time. Changes in inventory will be recorded in the perpetual inventory system at the time of the transaction.

59.How to Define a Takt Time?

Ans:

Takt time is derived from a German word Taktzeit, which might mean “measurement,” “cycle,” or “pulse” time, depending on a source. Simply put, takt time refers to a amount of time it takes a producer to produce enough goods per unit to meet the client demand.

60.Who should be involved in a Lean manufacturing?

Ans:

Any facility that need to implement or grow Lean manufacturing must carefully consider who should be involved in a process. In reality, Lean manufacturing will necessitate some form of a participation from everyone in a plant. While there may be asome people who act as the Lean leadership team, in order to achieve a best results, everyone must be involved.

61.Why is a Lean manufacturing called Lean?

Ans:

Lean manufacturing is a general method for helping businesses decrease a waste and enhance their facility’s bottom line. The approach is so well-known that more people aren’t even aware of its name, but it is an unusual.

62.What does a FTA stand for?

Ans:

A free trade agreement is agreement between a two or more countries to lower tariffs on imports and exports. Goods and services can be bought and sold across an international borders with little or no government tariffs, quotas, subsidies, or restrictions to the obstruct their interchange under free trade policy.

63.What do letters in an acronym DOWNTIME refer to in a Lean Methodology?

Ans:

The acronym for eight wastes is a DOWNTIME. Downtime stands for: Defects Overproduction Waiting Not an utilizing talent Transportation .

64. Have ever been caught stealing, or better yet, have an ever stole anything?

Ans:

Guess everyone takes pen or paper or little things like that. But other than a that, NO. have never stole from employers or better yet As a Lean Manufacturing Manager, from anyone.

65.Tell about a time when had to give someone difficult feedback As a Lean Manufacturing Manager?

Ans:

By asking this question, interviewer hopes to learn whether can communicate effectively, address issues in a workplace and motivate others during a difficult times. Giving a negative feedback requires honesty, thoughtfulness and tact. Answering this question well can help to show an interviewer would be a good fit for a managerial position or a position that involves working closely with the others.

66.Do think are overqualified for this position As a Lean Manufacturing Manager?

Ans:

No matter previous job experience or educational background, be sure to tell an interviewer have the knowledge and skills to successfully execute a job responsibilities.

67.What is a greatest failure As Lean Manufacturing Manager, and what did learn from it?

Ans:

When I was in a college, I took art class to supplement my curriculum. I didn’t take it more seriously, and assumed that, compared to my Engineering classes, it would be walk in a park.. I’d even a jeopardized my scholarship status. I knew I had to get my an act together. I spent a rest of the semester making up for it, ended up getting decent grade in a class. I learned that is no matter what I’m doing, I should strive to do it to do best of my ability.

68. What is a Gemba in lean?

Ans:

The term “Gemba” from the Japanese, and it means “a real place”. In a Lean management, “Gemba” is a most important place for a team as it is the place where a real work happens.

69. Which are the 3 main tools in a lean management?

Ans:

A Requiring less effort, a less time, and a fewer resources.

70.As a lean manager, what is a management style?

Ans:

Believe in a building team. Every member of the team should be clear on role, know where they fit in and feel as though they can depends on the one another. Also believe in a real-time feedback. If do something wrong that should know it immediately. Regardless of right or wrong, a further removed feedback is in time, a less effective it is.

71.What is a Six Sigma?

Ans:

This can be answered in more ways, can either give a description of metrics or methodology DMAIC, DMADV and DFSS or one can define the 6 times standard deviation that fits at a one side between a mean value and customer specification limits.

72.How did decide on a projects and what were the issues?

Ans:

Here must mention about a VOC or VOP. The VOC could be given by a clients or customers by reactive feedback or by conducting a survey or the customer’s ratings to the process. Through this, find the criteria as customer’s dissatisfactions towards a products or services.

73.What was a project scope?

Ans:

The project scope makes a boundaries for the project so that people should be a focus on the inside of the boundary and anything beyond boundary is not questionable for a projects. Boundaries can be limited to a one process, location, people and time durations.

74.How did set the goal of these projects?

Ans:

The project goals should be a basis for SMART approach, which could see by a confidence interval. How process is behaving.

75.How would decide the project level, whether it should be Black Belt or Green Belt project?

Ans:

These things depends upon a benefits and would get after the projects and area of projects. If a scope of the project is at the company level, it should be counted as Black belt project. However, if it is limited to a one single process, it would be considered as Green Belt project.

76.What would do after getting a VOC/VOP?

Ans:

Once receive a customer complaints and Voice of the process, and need to make Critical to Quality check which helps us to change a voice of customers into a metrics. Six Sigma would work on a practical problems and change them to statistical problems with the statically generated solutions.

77.What are Milestones?

Ans:

In a Six Sigma process, it depends upon a methodology, either DMAIC or DMADV, and for every stage, there should be some time durations involved, the milestones provided a time duration limit for every stage, if extend the time limits, and need the approval from a stakeholders.

78.What is a ARMI or RASIC?

Ans:

With the help of ARMI or RASIC, a whole Six Sigma team comes to know that who an authorized person is, who is responsible for a project, who should be the consultant and who should be informed so that there are no conflicts at a work.

79.What are types of data?

Ans:

Data can be of a two major types – Quantitative and Qualitative. Under a quantitative data comes a Continuous data and Discrete data attributed comes under a qualitative data category. This can be explained in a more detailed manner.

80.What is MSA?

Ans:

MSA is a Measurement System Analysis, using this see whether a measurement system is correct or not. For the service industries, do the Attribute analysis.

81.What is a Gauge R & R?

Ans:

In Gauge R and R, gauge by a repeatability and reproducibility. Here need to explain the difference between a repeatability and reproducibility.

82.What is a Normal distribution? If data is not normal, what should be a next step?

Ans:

In a Normal distribution, see a p-value, and if it is not normal, try to make it a normal or transfer into Box-Cox transformation.

83.What is a Process Capability and difference between Cp and Cpk?

Ans:

Here need to give a whole information about process and their capability with some real time examples. Also, explain the difference and benefits of Cpk and can not use a Cpk.

84. What are the 2 pillars of a Lean?

Ans:

The Pillars of a Lean: a Continuous Improvement and Respect for People.

85.What is an Ishikawa diagram?

Ans:

The Ishikawa diagram is also called a cause and effect diagram or a fishbone diagram. After a brainstorming session, use this to segregate all the problems in 6 Ms (manufacturing) and a 4 Ps (service industries).

86.What is a Pareto chart?

Ans:

Pareto is the most used tool in a six sigma and quality. Here must explain the Pareto analysis to prioritize the problems , or causes and define each and every aspect of a Pareto chart.

87.What is an Alpha and Beta risk or what is a P value?

Ans:

The alpha and beta risk, one should know a what is H0 and Ha, H0 is acceptable when have a p-value more than 0.05 or 5%. And if it is lesser, and accept Ha. And sometimes, what accept or reject could be a wrong assumptions, that time are on a risk, which could be a alpha and beta risk. And p-value is a probability, when are at 95% confidence with a sample, then are at 5% of risk chances or a probability. And if the p-value is more than a 5%, that time go as per H0, since risk ata higher side, however, if a p-value is lesser than 5%, and happy to take the risk and accept Ha. Hence, it can be more clear when doing at these risks, what all consequences of having these risks.

88.What is the difference between a R SQR and R SQR adjusted?

Ans:

These are the part of a regression testing, and one must know the actual reason to see a R SQR and R SQR adjusted.

89.What is affinity diagram?

Ans:

The clustering after a brainstorming sessions. And would get to know where need to keep all the inputs received by a team members.

90.If the data is a non-normal, what hypothesis test should do?

Ans:

  • If a data is non-normal, require to try to make data normal, if cannot, then need to use a non-normal hypothesis testing, as per their subgroup size.
  • After analyze phase, questions can be asked about a what improvement plans made, or the tools used. The improvement can be done using the FMEA, therefore should know what is a FMEA and what are the types of FMEA, what is RPN value and how to calculate it. And can also use a affinity diagram for the solution purpose, which can be done by a brainstorming to resolve the issues.
  • 91.What hypothesis test can do in improve phase?

    Ans:

    In a improve phase do the 2 samples testing to see the before and after effect. Therefore, should know what all the hypothesis tests and can do in improve phase.

    92.How and Why control is required?

    Ans:

    Control needs to be done once an improvement is sustained. Control is usually done after a project completion so that there are no prevailing issues.

    93.What are types of control charts?

    Ans:

    Must give information about all the control charts which use for a continuous data and discrete data.

    94.Why is a lean manufacturing important?

    Ans:

    Lean manufacturing is the practice of an eliminating waste while producing high-quality products with a maximum efficiency. When a company successfully meets a lean manufacturing benchmarks, it ultimately saves a time, material, and labor expenses—which means bigger profits at the end of day.

    95.What is a purpose of lean manufacturing?

    Ans:

    The goal of lean manufacturing is to obtain the competitive edge in a given production an industry through careful, calculated minimization of excess resources, ultimately bringing the boost in company profits, customer service, and an overall production efficiency.

    96.Exactly what kind of an inefficiencies can lean manufacturing eliminate?

    Ans:

    Lean manufacturing has been a formulaically proven to reduce a waste in the following seven areas: Transport, Inventory, Motion, Waiting, Over-processing, Overproduction, and Defects. Traditionally, these wastes have been referred to as a “Seven Wastes.” Download a guide on the Seven Wastes of lean manufacturing here.

    97.Can lean manufacturing be used in a environments outside of the shop floor?

    Ans:

    Yes. Lean manufacturing is not a practice exclusive to a factory floors. The core of lean manufacturing remains a same whether are in an office or on a shop floor—establish customer satisfaction benchmarks, develop a waste-free production process, configure how can continually complete a process in a value-add manner, and perfect process. Consider these four pillars of a lean manufacturing in any production environment and watch an efficiency and output rise enormously.

    98.How large does company have to be to practice efficient lean manufacturing?

    Ans:

    Lean manufacturing is a practice that can be utilized by a businesses of any type. At the core of it all, any company out there is selling the product or service to meet a client needs and generate a profit doing so. Whether are a brewery, packager or automotive manufacturer, lean manufacturing can give a powerful basic guidelines to running successful business.

    99. What are 4 principles of lean?

    Ans:

    • Principle 1: Respect for a People.
    • Principle 2: Push or Pull.
    • Principle 3: Value – Who Defines It?
    • Principle 4: Training Employees.

    100. What are 3 S’s of Lean?

    Ans:

    5S stands for a Sort, Straighten, Sweep, Standardize, and Sustain. 3S is a just three of these: Sort, Sweep, and Standardize.

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